Corsair's new power supplies spotted in certification documents

RMCSHX
Corsair's model numbering system isn't the most comprehensible one. Some people remember the times of the TX series, where a 750W unit could have six different versions over the years, or the CX series where the first revision was simply called "CX", the second one had a V2 suffix, and then the third (current) version went back to using plain CX again. In cases like these, you're often required to pay extra attention to the specific model number, rather than just the "friendly name".

Corsair's been using a couple of different ways to give model numbers to their power supplies. The first one was the "CMPSU" name: the Corsair VX 550W had a "CMPSU-550VX" model name, the GS 500W had the "CMPSU-500GS" and so on. Later, Corsair started using two other numbers to catalogue their products: the "75-" number (e.g. "75-010707" for CS550M), and a "CP-90" number (e.g. "CP-9020060" for CX600M).

Corsair CX600M label with the model designator<br>
Corsair CX600M label with the model designator
Photo courtesy of TechPowerUP
Corsair RM750's two model designators<br>
Corsair RM750's two model designators
Photo courtesy of TechPowerUP

With the HXi series, Corsair uses yet another (fourth already) designation: the RPS number. The HX750i got the RPS0002; the 850W and 1000W got RPS0003 and RPS0004 accordingly.

Corsair HX1000i with three model numbers<br>
Corsair HX1000i with three model numbers
Photo courtesy of TechPowerUP

It turns out that so far, Corsair has managed to use over twenty of such RPS codes - from RPS0001 up to RPS0024. Some of them are already known to be taken by the HXi series and the new CWT revisions of RM750 & RM850 - but that still leaves a couple of certified RPS codes with no matching power supply on the market. These numbers appear in certain places, and some of them have useful info associated with themselves.

Example instances of RPS codes in documents

For your convenience, here's a pair of formatted tables of known RPS codes and their corresponding units - the left one sorted by the RPS number and the right one sorted by their group association:

RPS code
Associated PSU
Extra information
RPS0002 HX750i
RPS0003 HX850i
RPS0004 HX1000i
RPS0005 HX1200i
RPS0006 550W
45.8A @ +12V
RPS0007 650W
54A @ +12V
RPS0008 Japan HX750i
RPS0009 Japan HX850i
RPS0010 Japan HX1000i
RPS0011 CS850M
RPS0017 850W
RPS0018
RPS0019 RM750v2
RPS0020 RM850v2
RPS code
Associated PSU
Extra information
RPS0002 HX750i
RPS0008 Japan HX750
RPS0019 RM750v2
RPS0003 HX850i
RPS0009 Japan HX850i
RPS0017 850W
RPS0020 RM850v2
RPS0004 HX1000i
RPS0010 Japan HX1000i
RPS0018 1000W
RPS0005 HX1200i
RPS0006 550W
45.8A @ +12V
RPS0007 650W
54A @ +12V
RPS0011 CS850M

As you can see for yourselves, the numbers that don't have any known PSU attached to them are RPS0018, RPS0017, RPS006 and RPS007. Another document details the specifications and load distribution of the 06 and 07 units, and also the source factory:

Keeping in mind Corsair's recent efforts to improve the RM series' attraction by refreshing the 750W and 850W units, one could start guessing that these new, mysterious 550W and 650W units are a sign of another refresh coming to the lower-powered Corsair RM power supplies. The 1000W RPS0018 unit could be a refresh of the RM1000, which received complaints about its ripple suppression capabilities and capacitors used.

If that's true, then the question remains which platform will the new units use. It's highly probable that the 1000W one will use Corsair's custom platform that was already used in the new RM750 & RM850, but it's unclear what will happen to the 550W & 650W units (if they really are RM replacements) - Corsair's platform isn't specified for anything less than 750W. CWT's current 80+ Gold offerings in this power range are PUQ-G (which the company makes effort to move away from), CSG-G (cost-efficient design which the RM450-650s share many similarities with), and CSC V-D (with digital monitoring capabilities). There's also CSH V-G, but it only comes in 650W at least.

Corsair keeps something locked away in their shed, and they don't want to show it prematurely to anyone. What do you think? Leave a comment below.

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